PhotoResizerQt: Simple Batch Image Resizer for Ubuntu Linux & Windows

For some, having the ability to resize your photos can be extremely important. For instance, I my self as a blogger, resize pictures (screenshots) when uploading to my web site in order to reduce or save the bandwidth because when resizing an image the size gets reduced automatically.

But if you have a lot of high quality pictures, waiting to be resized into a common format with the same settings, then you need a batch image converter. If you don’t need a lot of options and looking for lightweight tool, then “PhotoResizerQt” is a pretty decent one.

But please remember that, as mentioned before, it is quite limited in functions and one it particular is that we cannot change the output image format manually.

Few main features …

PhotoResizerQt-in-Ubuntu-11.10

*. Supports both single and batch image processing.

*. As mentioned above, does not support changing the output image format. and automatically uses the source image’s container format.

*. Change between few built in image resolutions (2048, 1280, 1024, 800, 640, 512 and 400 … These values are for image Width and the Height is automatically adjusted to retain the correct aspect ratio).

However, unlike with Converseen or “Sir” for instance, PhotoResizerQt does not let us manually change the output resolutions manually either.

*. Shows previews of the loaded images.

Well, that’s it.

If interested, you can install PhotoResizerQt in Ubuntu 12.04 Precise Pangolin and 11.10 Oneiric Ocelot (might work in 11.04 Natty Narwhal and 10.10 … not sure though) by first downloading the “.deb” packages form this PhotoResizerQt home page (includes packages for Windows too).

batch-image-resizing

If you’re okay with its limitations then for a lightweight tool, ‘PhotoResizerQt’ is not that bad after all. Good luck.

An RHCE, 'Linux' user with 14+ years of experience. Extreme lover of Linux and FOSS. He is passionate to test every Linux distribution & compare with the previous release to write in-depth articles to help the FOSS community.

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