Install ‘Trimage’ (image compressor) on Ubuntu 13.04, 12.10 & 12.04 LTS

‘Trimage’ is a utility that reduces the size of images by re-encoding (compressing) them. The encoding/compression is lossless, meaning that the images won’t lose any data, it just re-encodes them with aggressive image compression settings.

It is actually a GUI that relies on few command-line based tools for the actual re-encoding. As you can see from the below screenshot, it is also very simple thus won’t let you change any settings, and only supports JPG & PNG image formats.

Also remember that, depending on the image’s data (resolution, format, color depth etc) the time it takes to finish re-encoding an image will differ. However, while processing multiple images, if you have a multi-core processor, then ‘Trimage’ will use all the available cores for optimal performance.

Trimage-running-on-Ubuntu-12.10

You can drag ‘n’ drop images or can use the ‘Add and compress’ button for adding images, and as soon as images are added, it will automatically start re-compressing them. It displays data such as the ‘Filename’, ‘Old & New size’ and the efficiency of the compression as a percentage, and the main window can be minimized to the system tray area as well.

Installing it on Ubuntu 13.04, 12.10, 12.04 and 11.10 is pretty simple. Just put the below command on your Terminal window.

sudo apt-get install trimage

Search for ‘trimage’ in ‘Dash’ for opening it.

Any drawbacks ?

Well, other than not having the ability to change any settings (it’s really not a big deal), once the encoding starts, there is no way of stopping it!. Even if you close its window, it’ll still process the images from the background (the command-line tools it relies on).

optipng-running-from-the-background-after-exiting-Trimage

So if you had added a lot of images and ‘Trimage’ slowed down or made the OS less responsive, then unless you know how to use the ‘System Monitor’ and kill the command-line tools that run in the background, you will have to wait till it finishes everything.

Other than that, all in all, it is a great tool. It is also available for other GNU/Linux distributions, for more details, please visit this page.

An RHCE, 'Linux' user with 14+ years of experience. Extreme lover of Linux and FOSS. He is passionate to test every Linux distribution & compare with the previous release to write in-depth articles to help the FOSS community.

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